Top 7 Survival Tips for Fresh Graduates in the Workplace – News Couple
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Top 7 Survival Tips for Fresh Graduates in the Workplace


For many recent graduates, the transition from school to the workplace is a huge culture shock. They are transitioning from an environment where everyone was the same age and generational outlook to a suddenly diverse social environment with people of all ages and backgrounds present.


Learning the ropes of a new job, mastering the social ladder of the workplace, and in general, trying to figure out business etiquette can be very frustrating for new workers. Here are some survival tips for recent graduates in the workplace on navigating their new venture in the world of work:

1. Be patient

Today’s graduates are used to the fast pace of technology, and in a way, this has created a low tolerance for being willing to wait. Especially for job promotions or promotion. But unfortunately, the big wheels of business don’t move that fast and sometimes the opportunity isn’t there yet.

take a deep breath. It will happen, but not necessarily on your schedule. Great things come to those who wait!

2. Don’t forget to thank those who help you

A recent college graduate listens to his teacher at his new job

Morals are important, and those who have made an effort to help you remember who to thank or not. This can have far-reaching effects on your career.

Those individuals who have become your biggest supporters (which is reinforced by taking the time to thank them) can open doors you couldn’t even imagine… both now and in the future.

3. Realize that your career will be a series of choices, not choice A.

A recent college graduate is working on her new job

I read somewhere the average high school student today will have 23 jobs in their lifetime. So, if the stats don’t lie, you definitely won’t be putting all your eggs in one basket.

Don’t like the work you do? Isn’t it rewarding enough? Then develop your transferable skills and get them into a new job where you will enjoy what you do.

4. Tread lightly and carefully

A college graduate talk to a co-worker

I’m not saying that you need to fear your co-workers, but you should know that the political environment in the office can play out in a similar way to social gangs at school… with deadly consequences.

Refrain from gossip and choose your words carefully. Until you get an accurate reading of everyone in your office, keep your cards close to your chest. There is no place for gossip in the workplace, but it does happen, and that person you captured can easily turn around and stab you in the back. Keep your own attorney.

5. Education does not end with your graduation

Recent college graduate confirmed about work

There are not many career centers or colleges/universities that prepare students for the amazing fact that their education is endless. In fact, I just started.

In addition to your formal education, there is a whole new world of learning called “professional development”. These are the things that will give you the job-specific skills to be successful. The sooner you realize the fact that you need to demonstrate continuous learning by taking classes, training courses, workshops, webinars, attending conferences, trade shows and conferences, as well as earning industry certifications, the sooner you will apply. Everyone else in your graduating class.

This process does not end until you retire. And if you ignore this area, you will have a much more difficult career advancement because employers hire subject matter experts. How do you build your knowledge?

6. Network

New college graduates in their new job

At school, this was called making friends. And you will do the same, but in the course of business.

Some of my best friends were interviewed while we worked together. The point is, networking really works to build a connection with the people you have some kind of common interest or goal with. When you have the “spider web” of people in your network, you will find that work and life opportunities flow your way more easily because these are the people who can and want to help you.

7. Realize that your co-workers are not your parents

A recent college graduate taking notes at work

I say this is tongue in cheek, but the subtext of this phrase is really important: Now you’re on your own and you can’t expect anyone to pick up the slack. All you do from this point on is business, and you are not bound by any bonds other than your employment agreement.

It is very scary to be suddenly put out in the “chill” after having a warm and supportive environment at home and school. The world of work doesn’t work that way. Either you drown or you swim. You are judged by your actions and you should always do the right thing and never expect someone to be there to catch you when you fall. This is called life, and over the course of your career, you will make mistakes and you will have to learn from them. This is called experience. And the more experience you gain, the closer you will be to reaching your career goals.

If you’re a recent college graduate and just starting out in your career, follow these seven tips for surviving your first job. Remember: getting started is the hardest part. I’ve got this!

Do you need more help with your career as a recent graduate?

Check out our free resources page and live events calendar.

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Struggling to find the right job?

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This article was originally published at an earlier date.

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